Patients

Featured Patients

  • AMERICAN BALD EAGLE (E8) #16-361

    On May 13, E8 returned to CROW for the second time after being struck by a great horned owl that resulted in a broken leg. After 3 months of recovery […]

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  • AMERICAN BALD EAGLE (OZZIE) #15-543

    American bald eagle (315-543) was brought to CROW the first time on March 17, 2015 after being found on railroad tracks in North Fort Myers suffering from a broken clavicle […]

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  • Bald Eagles #21-278 & #21-279 (E17 & E18)

    On January 29, we were granted permission from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to retrieve E17 and E18 from the Southwest Florida Eagle Cam nest to provide a veterinary check […]

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  • North American River Otters (#21-458) (#21-488) (#21-871)

    North American river otters are the most abundant otter species.  They have playful, sociable personalities.  As semi-aquatic mammals, they can thrive in any water habitat-cold, warm, or high-elevat [...]

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  • STRIPED SKUNK SIBLINGS (#21-4744,4745)

    Instantly recognizable, striped skunks are known for their signature coloration and for their ability to emit a strong and pungent odor when upset. This species is larger and more common […]

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PATIENTS ADMITTED

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Date Admitted: September 2, 2021
Status: Released

Instantly recognizable, striped skunks are known for their signature coloration and for their ability to emit a strong and pungent odor when upset. This species is larger and more common in Southwest Florida than the spotted skunk. They prefer grassy fields, while spotted skunks try to avoid open areas. Did you know the average lifespan of striped skunks in the wild is 7 years but they can live up to 10 years in human care!

On September 2, two newborn striped skunk siblings (#21-474 & 21-4745) were admitted after being found outside of their burrow in Cape Coral. Finders reported not seeing the mother for over two days. Upon examination, the skunks were dehydrated and thin. Veterinarians suspect they were orphaned. The two baby skunks will remain in CROW’s care until they are old enough to be released!

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Date Admitted: March 17, 2015
Status: Deceased

American bald eagle (315-543) was brought to CROW the first time on March 17, 2015 after being found on railroad tracks in North Fort Myers suffering from a broken clavicle on his left wing. After 3 months of recovery and rehabilitation, Ozzie was released on June 17, 2015 at the Southwest Florida Eagle Cam.

Ozzie was brought to CROW a second time on September 27, 2015 after he was found weak and injured in a North Fort Myers backyard most likely from a fight with another bald eagle. He arrived in critical condition, unable to stand and fighting a bacterial blood infection. Unfortunately, on September 29, 2015 Ozzie passed away as a result of his injuries.

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Date Admitted: May 13, 2016
Date Released: August 18, 2016
Status: Released

On May 13, E8 returned to CROW for the second time after being struck by a great horned owl that resulted in a broken leg. After 3 months of recovery and a successful rehabilitation the eaglet was released on August 13, 2016.

E8 was first brought to CROW on February 10, 2016 as a result of its leg being entangled in monofilament line. After having the line removed and spending a few days recoving, the eaglet was returned to its nest on February 12, 2016.

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Date Admitted: February 10, 2021
Status: Released

North American river otters are the most abundant otter species.  They have playful, sociable personalities.  As semi-aquatic mammals, they can thrive in any water habitat-cold, warm, or high-elevation areas-as long as the habitat provides adequate food.

On February 10, a male juvenile river otter was admitted after being found alone on the side of the road. He presented as a healthy orphan and has been recieving supportive care.

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Date Admitted: March 13, 2021
Date Released: May 7, 2021
Status: Released

Bald eagles fledge at about eight to 12 weeks. Prior to their first flight, nestlings will flap their wings in the nest or while jumping to an adjacent branch.  Their first flights are generally downward glides from the elevated nest to lower branches or the ground.

On March 13, a nestling bald eagle was admitted from Bokeelia after it fell from the nest and was found on the ground.

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Date Admitted: January 29, 2021
Status: Released

On January 29, we were granted permission from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to retrieve E17 and E18 from the Southwest Florida Eagle Cam nest to provide a veterinary check and treatment for their eyes.

Thanks to help from our friends at Joshua Tree, Inc we were able to remove them and transport them to our clinic on Sanibel.

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