Newsroom

CROW Case of the Week: Double-Crested Cormorant (19-4220)


The doublecrested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) is a large water bird with a long S-shaped neck and a prehistoric look. While it is related to the frigatebird, this swimming bird looks more like a cross between a goose and a loon, and sometimes is confused for the latter. The cormorant gets its name from its double crest that is only visible on adults during breeding season. The cormorant crests are black in most regions, except for Alaska where they are white. more...

Washed Away in a Sea of Red: The Impact of Harmful Algal Blooms on Wildlife Health


Few people who stay for long on Florida’s West coast can fail to be aware of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and, more specifically, red tides. Although more than 50 HAB species occur in the Gulf of Mexico, one of the most well-known species is Karenia brevis (K. brevis), the Florida red tide organism. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Red-Shouldered Hawk (#19-4001)


The red-shouldered hawk (Buteo lineatus)is considered one of the most distinctively marked common hawks out there. It is thus named due to its barred peachred chest area and brownish-red wing feathers. more...

CROW Medical & Research Director Presents at ExoticsCon


The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) Medical & Research Director, Dr. Heather Barron, recently presented a research talk and two masterclasses at ExoticsCon, a conference for veterinary professionals, held September 29 to October 3 in St. Louis, Missouri. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Limpkin (#19-3949)


The limpkin (Aramus guarauna) is a long-legged bird of the marshes. It also has a long neck and long yellow-tinted bill, which is wellshaped and heavy enough to pry open and break apart its favorite delicacy, apple snails. more...