Newsroom

CROW CAWs


This week's CAW | Doves at CROW - At CROW, there are two commonly admitted native doves; the Common Ground Dove and the Mourning Dove. The Common Ground Dove is native to Florida and resides here year-round. It forages in dusty open areas where their plumage provides great camouflage. They have reddish-brown wings distinguishing them from the Mourning Dove. Mourning Doves reside year-round in almost all areas of the United States. more...

CROW Feathers: Reese Hartmann


CROW Feathers is a chance for you to meet and learn a little bit about the staff, students, and volunteers working behind-the-scenes to help rescue, rehabilitate and release the thousands of wildlife patients admitted to CROW's hospital each year! more...

CROW Case of the Week: Royal Tern (#21-4876)


The royal tern (Thalasseus maximus) is a whitish bird with gray wings. It stands out with its black shaggy crown and daggerlike orange bill. This shorebird can be seen in a colony along the sandy beaches or diving for small fish in shallow waters. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Striped Skunks (#21-4744 & #21-4745)


The striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) is a medium-sized mammal with a glossy black coat, a thin, white stripe between its eyes and two stripes on its back. Skunk babies are blind and deaf when they are born. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Wood Stork (#21-4617)


The wood stork (Mycteria americana) is a large black-and-white waterbird with long legs and black flight feathers. It breeds in Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas, while non-breeding wood storks can be found throughout North America and into northern Argentina. While they are often the same size, wood storks differ from herons by the size of their bills (thicker) and shape of their bills (more curved than herons). A wood stork also has a featherless neck and head, with gray rough, scaly skin covering that area. more...