Newsroom

One Health for Wildlife, Humans, and the Earth


Every year, tens of thousands of people grow sick from illnesses contracted from animals. At CROW, we have a commitment to the One World, One Health concept which emphasizes a collaborative approach to the interrelated health of animals, people, and the ecosystem. more...

Good Animals Gone Bad: The High Cost of Invasive Species


An invasive species is defined as an alien species whose introduction does, or is likely to cause, economic or environmental harm or harm to human health. They typically affect native species through predation, habitat degradation and competition for shared resources and thus are one of the leading threats to native wildlife. more...

Lead Poisoning: How It Affects You and Wildlife Too


The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) recognizes that lead is a potent toxin to humans and wildlife (especially birds) that can have individual and population-level effects. Lead is a toxic metal, yet tons of lead are deposited into our environment annually through hunting, fishing, and recreational shooting. more...

Feeding Wildlife? You May Be Loving Them To Death!


If you are feeding wild animals, you may be killing them with kindness. There are many reasons not to feed wildlife, including some that may affect your own health! At the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW), we frequently see wildlife casualties that have gotten into trouble scavenging for handouts from well-meaning nature lovers. Here are some things you may want to consider before you offer Mother Nature’s children any tidbits.  more...

If You Care, Leave It There.


Every year wildlife hospitals, like the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) on Sanibel, are flooded with young animals that are abducted away from their parents by well-intentioned people who believe these babies to be orphaned. In fact, wild animals are very devoted to the care of their young and human interference is rarely warranted. more...