Newsroom

CROW Case of the Week: Bald Eagle Fledgling (#18-1408)


Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) are known for building the largest tree nests ever recorded for any animal species. Not surprisingly, these homes are very large in order to compensate for the size of the parents and their fast-growing young. By the time eagle chicks are 9 weeks old, they are fully grown. These young reportedly remain in the nest to gain strength for 10 to 12 weeks before flying off. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Injured Migrating Songbirds


Migrating songbirds, including many species of warblers, thrushes, vireos, orioles, flycatchers and grosbeaks, to name a few, are known to be strong travelers. During the course of an evening, these night fliers can cover more than 200 miles only to find a tree near dawn to rest up for another night of migration. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Burrowing Owl (#18-1323)


The burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) is not your typical owl. One of Florida’s smallest owls, this species stands only at an average height of nine inches tall. This small owl with long legs and brown body with speckles of white also spends most of its time on the ground instead of high on a tree branch looking for prey. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Loggerhead Shrike (#18-0961)


The loggerhead shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) is not related to a familiar sea turtle that is currently beginning to nest on local beachfronts, but rather is a thickbodied songbird that is so-named due to the relatively large size of its head as compared to the rest of its body. These tweeters sing during courting or do so to maintain territories. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Common Loon (#18-0985)


The common loon (Gavia immer) is a long-bodied water bird whose biggest distinction from its cousins – Pacific loon and red-throated loon – is its head color in the summer months. From April to September, the so-called great northern diver has a black head and bill to go along with their black-and-white spotted back and white breast. more...